Award, Case Study, Interior, Living Room

‘Top Job’ Award Winning Project – 2015 APC Award

The Project that Won it All for Us in 2015.

It’s official we’ve won again for the third year in a row! Every year the American Painting Contractor (APC) awards the top residential painting company in each region across the country. We have won it each year three years running for the Western Region.


Here is the residential painting project we submitted that won it all for us this year!

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Background


We were invited to look at the paint finish work throughout a complete remodel in Las Estadas. The homeowner was unhappy with the finish craftsmanship of the contractor who completed the remodel.

We have done extensive work throughout the Las Estadas community, in Phoenix, for the last thirteen years. In fact, this particular client used my services in the past: In the early 2000s, I re-stained their front door from a light oak to a darker color; they were one of the first homeowners in that community to update their front entry.

 

The Problem

I met with the homeowner to determine what steps could be taken to remedy the finishes on both walls and woodwork, more specifically. Expectations between homeowner and the contractor were clearly not communicated satisfactorily throughout the remodel. Unfortunately, I have seen this problem throughout the Phoenix area on remodels. In addition, I have come across many contractors believing that paint-and-primer-in-one will work on new substrates. If only they had the information from Debbie Zimmer of Quality Paint Institute that a true primer application followed by two coats of quality paint is considered the best practice. My practice is to sand pre-primed wood, prime with a quality primer, re-sand, and top-coat sanding between coats.


If only they had the information from Debbie Zimmer of Quality Paint Institute that a true primer application followed by two coats of quality paint is considered the best practice.


The finish was dry-rolled with stipples on all doors and faces of the five inch window and door trim. Crown molding and baseboards were brushed, filled with brush marks and nail holes that had been improperly filled leaving sunken, missed and excess caulk that had not been removed. Installing the crown molding required additional drywall work. The old walls and ceilings were floated smooth to a level five. Registers and air returns were floated up to and when new registers and air returns were installed, they were smaller in size leaving unfinished drywall.

 

The Solution

The first step for me was to create a sample of sheens and finishes that the homeowner was seeking. I put together semi-gloss and satin finishes in two products, Break-through by PPG and Dunn Edwards’ Evershield. They selected the Break-through satin finish that closely matched the existing shutter finish. The second step was to estimate the total cost. We decided best to do an area that included a bedroom and attaching bathroom and from there I calculated man hours and material. I was asked to re-finish all wood and selected portions of the walls. Ceilings only required touch-up around registers and areas where tape pulled off the finish. Several complete walls required painting from corner to corner. All walls were repainted in the master bedroom and garage entry hallway.


The Numbers


The total surface refinishing was calculated to a square foot and divided into a daily rate. The total number of linear/square feet refinished was:


Crown molding:
869 sq. ft.

 

Baseboards:
301 sq. ft.

 

Interior doors (20), jambs and castings:
1,079 sq. ft.

 

Jambs/castings only on exterior doors:
103 sq. ft.

 

Windows (11), trim and sills:
153 sq. ft.

Interior walls:
1,304 sq. ft.

 


The Deliverables

The 3,809 sq. ft. had to be refinished involving the following steps and products:

 

  1. 3M Pro Grade Precision – sand latex paint with grits of 150, 220, 320, 400 and 3M fine finish pads
  2. Festool – sand using the RTS 400 EQ, ETS 125 EQ, Rotex RO90 FEQ, DTS 400 EQ
  3. Festool – used negative air floor system to evacuate dust and overspray
  4. Zip wall systems were used to create work areas for dust control
  5. Spot primed any area where raw wood was exposed after sanding using Aerosol Zinsser 1∙2∙3 and Dunn Edwards Interior/Exterior Stain-Blocking Primer
  6. All nicks, holes, cracks and any other imperfections were filled with 3M Patch Plus Primer, PPG Top Gun Caulk 250, 300 or 500 depending on the area. Bondo was used on damaged areas
  7. Wood surfaces were two coated with GRACO HVLP and PPG Break-through Satin was applied, sanding between coats with 3M 400 and 3M fine pads to achieve the desired finish
My Final Take

 


I discovered that when the walls and ceilings were taped to protect them from overspray, latex paint was pulled away from the drywall in many areas, which is evidence that the walls were not dusted or a primer applied before painting. These areas required the latex paint to be cut clean, spot primed with Zinsser Guards, patched with 3M Patch Plus Primer and then re-painted.


When the walls and ceilings were taped to protect them from overspray, latex paint was pulled away from the drywall in many areas, which is evidence that the walls were not dusted or a primer applied before painting. The homeowners gave me the flexibility to work on this project and keep other prior commitments. Luke Thalheimer, from the Cabinet Painting Company, assisted in the project.

 

Several complete walls were required to be re-painted, but were sanded prior to top-coating. I also had to apply Guards to the ceiling registers, re-float the drywall, prime and re-paint. All doors and hardware were removed and re-finished at the site in a room that was set-up for that purpose and cut the cost of off-site refinishing.


The homeowners gave me the flexibility to work on this project and keep other prior commitments. Luke Thalheimer, from the Cabinet Painting Company, assisted in the project.

Steve Adickes, Owner of Adix Painting

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